Thursday, February 23, 2017

Acute Limb Ischemia: A Literal Case of Cold Feet

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This post was peer reviewed.
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Author: Jennifer Reink, MSIV
Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine

Case
A 58-year-old Caucasian male was brought into a community emergency department via ambulance for evaluation of sudden onset left leg pain and right leg numbness. He stated that about five hours earlier, he had begun to experience severe sharp pains shooting down the entire length of his left leg. His right leg had initially felt like pins and needles, but prior to arrival had gone completely numb, to the point that he was unable to lift it. He denied recent trauma, back or abdominal pain, or urinary or stool incontinence. Upon further review, we learned that he had a history of stroke, abdominal aortic aneurysm with graft repair, hypertension, and diabetes. He was taking the associated medications for these conditions, which did not include an anticoagulant. He had no prior history of tobacco, alcohol, or drug use.

Sunday, February 19, 2017

Necrotizing Fasciitis: A Dermatologic Emergency

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Author: Lauren Van Woy, OMS III
Western University of Health Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific

Introduction
Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare but potentially fatal dermatologic infection that emergency physicians must be able to promptly recognize and treat. Misdiagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis is common, with 41% to 96% of cases falsely identified as a less serious soft tissue infection (such as cellulitis or an abscess).[1] Failure to treat necrotizing fasciitis can lead to sepsis, organ failure, and death.[2] Therefore, it is imperative to have a low threshold for diagnosis.